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BOY SCOUT TROOP 33
First Lutheran Church - DeKalb, Illinois


FAIRDALE TORNADO


DISASTER PAGE
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"To help other people at all times"




FAIRDALE TORNADO


      - Background
      - Fujita Scale
      - Project #1
      - Project #2
      - News Coverage
      - Support

Troop 33 Disaster Page
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Scouts from Troop 33 worked with locations related to the Fairdale Tornado and invested themselves in hard physical labor to benefit the community.

Their work time has was spent in doing two major projects.




















- Background - Fujita Scale - Project #1 - Project #2 - News Coverage - Support




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EF-4 TORNADO - APRIL 9, 2015
HARRISBURG, ILLINOIS



BACKGROUND

Thursday April 9 a tornado swept across a 50-mile swath of north central Illinois.

The deadly tornado left a path of destruction from near Franklin Grove in Lee County to North of Rochelle and Hillcrest in Ogle County into northwest DeKalb County and southern Boone County and lastly to near Harvard in McHenry County, according to the weather service.

Just before 7 p.m., a tornado hit a Crest Foods warehouse in Ashton, Ill., causing the roof to collapse, according to the Franklin Grove Fire Protection District.

Several homes in the Rochelle area were destroyed or seriously damaged, including that of Ogle County Sheriff Brian VanVickle, Travis said.

A short time later, fire crews from multiple jurisdictions responded to Grubsteakers Restaurant near Illinois Routes 251 and 64 in Rochelle after the building reportedly was hit by a tornado.

About a dozen people were inside the restaurant, and firefighters rescued five people trapped beneath rubble about 8:30 p.m., according to Randy Travis, assistant chief of Oregon Fire Protection District.

In Fairdale, a town of about 200, two women were killed and at least seven others hospitalized with injuries as the tornado hit at 7:15 p.m.

Rescue crews worked throughout the night and into Friday morning sifting through the rubble. Every home in Fairdale was searched twice to ensure no one was missed.

Each home was affected with some crushed down to their foundation and others with only broken windows. Due to structural damage many of the standing homes were not repairable and needed to be torn down. Century old trees were left as only skeletal trunks. The powerful tornado basically came through and destroyed the community of Fairdale in just minutes.


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FUJITA SCALE
& TORNADO FREQUENCY





The Enhanced Fujita Scale (EF Scale)

INTRODUCTION

Dr. T. Theodore Fujita first introduced The Fujita Scale in the SMRP Research Paper, Number 91, published in February 1971 and titled, "Proposed Characterization of Tornadoes and Hurricanes by Area and Intensity".

Fujita revealed in the abstract his dreams and intentions of the F-Scale. He wanted something that categorized each tornado by intensity and area. The scale was divided into six categories:


                        • EF-0 (Gale) -- 65-85 mph --
                        • EF-1 (Weak)
-- 86-110 mph --
                        • EF-2 (Strong)
-- 111-135 mph --
                        • EF-3 (Severe)
-- 136-165 mph --
                        • EF-4 (Devastating)
-- 166-200 mph --
                        • EF-5 (Incredible)
-- over 200 mph --

Dr. Fujita's goals were for the F-Scale to:
      - categorize each tornado by its intensity and its area
      - estimate a wind speed associated with the damage



AVERAGE NUMBER OF TORNADOES IN THE U.S PER YEAR



FAIRDALE IL -- EF-4 TORNADO




PROJECT #1

Troop 33's first relief project took place April 12 within 72 hours of the disaster. The Schabacker farm on Hemstock Road northwest of Rochelle, Illinois was directly hit by the tornado, leveling all the barns, destroying everything but the farmhouse. It had been farmed by generations of the same family since 1863. The Scouts were camping nearby at Adventure Scout Camp.

The power of the tornado scattered debris from damaged homes immediately south of the farm covering its acreage. Fields were covered with rafters, beams, roofing, and just about anything else you can imagine. With the owner’s permission, our Scouts worked on the property walking fields and removing debris. More than a hundred other volunteer workers also removed debris that day. It was a project immediately crucial before any planting could be done.

We worked on an area covering 140-acres. As we walked the fields we found and collected all sorts of debris which were placed together in large piles. Some items were extremely large and heavy. Some had to be pried back and forth and pulled out of the ground. Tractors pulled hay wagons to load and carry the debris away to a central location and then to a landfill. The debris collected filled several hay wagons. It felt good to be making a difference.



Scouts from Troop 33 cleared debris from acres of farmland northeast of Rochelle.


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PROJECT #2

Troop 33’s second project took place northwest of Kirkland on Wheeler Road where a wooded property lost over 300 trees downed by the tornado. There to help to clear downed trees, adults manned chain saws, older Scouts used hand saws, while younger Scouts carried wood. From the downed trees stacks of cut wood and brush piles were created. D Ryan Tree Service donated a Bobcat and operator to move giant logs. Hard work made a visible difference.

Recovery from the tornado will involve so much more. There are more fields to walk, more debris to remove, and so many more downed trees to clear. There are donated items to be sorted, hundreds of young trees to plant and so much money needs to be raised. Community groups and individual volunteers are needed.



Troop 33 Scouts and leaders worked to help clear downed trees in a wooded area.


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NEWS COVERAGE

Boys Life Magazine Online
April 2015
Illinois Scouts help clean up after another tornado

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SUPPORT



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Our disaster relief projects made a significant improvement in the recovery of the community. Acres of a farm were cleared of tornado debris. A wooded area covered with over 300 downed trees were improved by Troop 33 Scouts and leaders. The Scouts of Troop 33 lived the Oath and Law while investing sweat, hard work, and determination for the benefit of others.

MEMBERS OF TROOP 33'S
APRIL WORK CREWS

ADULTS
- Nick Aase
- Amy Barnes
- Cohen Barnes
- Tom Comer
- Stephanie Comer
- Cliff Golden
- Michele Gray
- Tim Gray
- Mason Keith
- Tara Kieth
- Chad McNett
- Stacy McNett
- Nathan Overmann
- Chris Radtke
- Steve Radtke
- Joey Ryan
- Bob Snow
- Taylor Swinson
- Isaac Truckenbrod
YOUTH
- Hank Barnes
- Jordan Burke
- Bryce Comer
- Travis deOliveira
- Austin Johnson
- Ryan McNett
- Joe Montavon
- Austin Petrie
- Jack Petrie
- Brandon Radtke
- Timmy Schlick
- Dalton West
- Anikan Weston
- Logan Weston
- Seth Wickens-Walther
SIBLINGS
- Maddie Barnes
- Gracie Comer
- Sydney McNett
- Megan Radtke



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